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Luxury five-star hotel with Olympic sized pool and casino doesn't actually exist

The Manchester city centre hotel appears to also be in Tokyo and on a tropical island

Luxury five-star hotel with Olympic sized pool and casino doesn't actually exist
A view through one window seems to show the a tropical beach (Image: MEN Media)

Holiday makers yearning for a slice of luxury have been warned to avoid a five-star - because it doesn't actually exist.

The Grand Pearl, in Manchester city centre, is said to contain 235 rooms and operates under the tagline 'Paradise here on earth'.

As well an Olympic sized swimming pool, a glass walled riverside restaurant and a penthouse suite complete with a baby grand piano, the hotel is packed with rooms of "dynamic luxury".

Not all is at it seems however.

The listed address doesn't actually exist and the phone number, when called by the Manchester Evening News , isn't answered.

The hotel seems to look out onto Tokyo (Image: MEN Media)

The city's council has warned it is a sham, with the website linked to an IP address in Nigeria.

The website claims that the Grand Pearl is "one of the newest 5 star hotels in the city", operating since 2014 and hosting thousands of guests in that time - including celebrities and politicians.

Photos show large double beds lying beneath expansive headboards, with plenty of room to relax in the seating area or get down to some important work at the desk.

One clue that the hotel is less corporal than advertised are the landscapes visible through the window.

In one a majestic cityscape has skyscrapers towering above what appears to be a Tokyo skyline.

In another a palm tree stands out against the bright blue sky and sea.

The website goes into great detail about the websites many features (Image: MEN Media)

The continuity error hasn't stopped the website host asking £185 for the cheapest room.

Those looking to check in to the fictional hotel can rest assured they will be in safe hands.

"Around the clock security guards and an in-house medical team" guarantee guests' security.

The website boasts: "Dangers of many kinds can lurk at any corner; therefore we have taken all necessary measures to ensure your safety and peace of mind while playing host to you.”

A 100-space car park, casino, art gallery, grand ballroom for as many as 280 people and an outlet selling Versace are other key features.

Reviews praised the non-existent hotel (Image: MEN Media)

A number of customer testimonials featured on one page of the site speak highly of the hotel, despite its total lack of existence.

One, posted by George B B from Sheffield, reads: “This hotel must have the most comfy beds in Manchester! It's ideally located for nights out, also has a great bar.”

Angela Bunett from Madrid recalls a stay for a friend's 50th birthday.

“We did not get to eat in the Grand Pearl Oval Restaurant as we failed to make reservations on time and it was fully booked,” she wrote.

This is where the Grand Pearl should be...if it existed (Image: MEN Media)

“The sunny personality of the concierge was heartwarming. Did not get his name but when I do I will mention him in my next review as I will be staying there again shortly. Keep up the good work. Location superb.”

In an attempt to confirm the existence of the mystery hotel Manchester Evening News reporter Chris Slater went to the given address only to find an empty parking lot and an office.

A receptionist inside the building told him: "We often get people coming in asking for the Radisson but never that one.

The Grand Pearl is supposed to be near Manchester's prestigious Midland Hotel (Image: MEN Media)

"In fact we get people who are lost and are looking for hotels all over the city and I have never, ever heard of the Grand Pearl.

"That sounds more like a Chinese buffet restaurant than a five star hotel."

A council spokesman advised tourists to book through a reputable travel agent or booking website when searching for holidays or accommodation.

They added: "Guidance on how to avoid scams can be found through the Association of British Travel Agents (ABTA) website, at www.abta.com."

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