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5 Real Places On Earth That Seem Scientifically Impossible

1) Naga Fireballs :

Naga Fireballs, also known as bung fai phaya nak or "Mekong lights" and formerly "ghost lights" are a phenomenon said to be seen annually on the Mekong River. Glowing balls are alleged to naturally rise from the water high into the air. The balls are said to be reddish and to range in size from smaller sparkles up to the size of basketballs. They quickly rise up to a couple of hundred metres before disappearing. The number of fireballs reported varies between ten and thousands per night. The phenomenon is attributed to phaya nak, a giant serpent said to live in the Mekong. The fireballs are most often reported around the night of Wan OK Phansa at the end of Buddhist Lent in late October. One explanation is that the fireball is result of flammable phosphine gas generated by the marshy environment. Some individuals have attempted to explain the phenomenon scientifically. A similar explanation involves a similar phenomenon in plasma physics.

5 Real Places On Earth That Seem Scientifically Impossible
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2) Gates Of Hell :

The Darvaza gas crater known locally as the Door to Hell Or Gates of Hell, is a natural gas field collapsed into an underground cavern located in Derweze, Turkmenistan. The Gates of Hell are various places on the surface of the world that have acquired a legendary reputation for being entrances to the underworld. Geologists intentionally set it on fire to prevent the spread of methane gas and it is thought to have been burning continuously since 1971. The gas reserve found here is one of the largest in the world. The Turkmen government hopes that the crater will become a popular tourist attraction. The site was identified by Soviet engineers in 1971.

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3) Kelimutu :

Kelimutu is a volcano, close to the small town of Moni in central Flores island in Indonesia. The volcano is around 50 km to the east of Ende, Indonesia, the capital of Ende regency in East Nusa Tenggara province. The mountain has three volcanic crater lakes that differ in color. Lake colors periodically change due to adjustments in the oxidation-reduction status of the fluid of each lake and also considering the abundance of different major elements, such as iron and manganese. The colors in the lakes change independently from each other, as each has its own unique connectivity to the underlying volcano's activity. There are three lakes on the mountain sharing the same name, Kelimutu meaning 'the boiling lake'. Each has its own colors and a local name. Sometimes the colors are blue, green, black and red.

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4) Magnetic Hill :

Magnetic Hill is a "Cyclops hill" located near Leh in Ladakh, India. The layout of the area and surrounding slopes create the appearance of a hill. The hill road is actually a downhill road. Objects and cars on the hill road may appear to roll uphill in defiance of gravity when they are, in fact, rolling downhill. The reason is the Magnetic Hill that pulls stationery vehicles upwards. There are hundreds of recognized gravity hills around the world. The slope of gravity hills is an optical illusion, although sites are often accompanied by claims that magnetic or supernatural forces at work. The most important factor contributing to the illusion is a completely or mostly obstructed horizon. Without a horizon, it becomes difficult to judge the slope of a surface as a reliable reference is missing.

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5) Sea Split Into Two :

In Ponnani beach in the northern district of Malappuram, a sandbed has formed right across the sea post the floods. The sandbed which runs for nearly a kilometer into the sea, has been attracting scores of tourists, forcing the police to be on alert fearing safety issues. The sandbed has formed following the deposits caused by the excess rain and the opening of the shutters of the Malampuzha dam and the Aliyar dam in neighbouring Tamil Nadu. People can now walk into the sea over the sandbed from the shore but it is not safe as the sea can be rough due to high tide, which we can't predict. If high tide occurs after people walk into the sea, it would be difficult for them to come back.

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Topic: #earth
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HOT COMMENTS

Taimur

Wow interesting amazing beautiful dangerous

4 Months ago

1
Narsingh

It's so awesome

4 Months ago

0
Amreen Taj477

too scary

5 Months ago

0
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